Wildlife sightings 29 March 2018

Notes from the Discovery Centre team – Alex

A surprise sighting today of an otter behind the new flood wall. Strong waves and the swell had forced it to take shelter on the rocks. Otherwise it looked very healthy.

Gannet numbers are beginning to increase following the spell of poor weather and we have noticed a few pairs reuniting after spending the winter apart. The big news of the week however was the return of puffins to the Isle of May and Fidra respectively. They are still a little flighty at the moment and although we see plenty in the mornings they are often gone before midday. Guillemots and razorbills are also being spotted on many of the islands but again only in the mornings before heading back out to sea later on in the day.

Kittiwakes have also returned to Dunbar harbour in small numbers but the stacks have begun to fill and fill over the past couple of days which is great to see. Cormorants and shags are returning to their nests respectively and especially the Craigleith colony. Still no sign of our favourite shag pairs on the Isle of May and we are hoping that they managed to escape the poor weather.

To keep up-to-date with the webcam action, click HERE.

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Wildlife sightings 22 March 2018

Notes from the Discovery Centre team – Erin

As of today, the first kittiwakes have arrived back at Dunbar harbour! There are currently three birds sitting back on their nest sights. Kittiwakes are a globally threated species, so let’s hope the weather improves for a successful breeding season.

On the weather, we’ve had more luck spotting guillemots and razorbills along the beach than on the cameras. A fair few birds have been washing ashore with the lucky ones coming in tired and dehydrated.

Gannets have started to reunite with their mates with at least two pairs observed beak fencing over this past week. Although arriving back a little later than usual, the first eggs won’t be laid until the end of April so there’s still a little while to go.

To keep up-to-date with the webcam action, click HERE.

Wildlife sightings 15 March 2018

Notes from the Discovery Centre team – Alex

Following the temperamental weather the gannets have been coming and going over the past few weeks but things seem to be settling now, we hope! Still only individual gannets on their nest spots so far with no sign of any pairs having met back up, but we are keeping our eyes peeled for reunited pairs.

Guillemots and razorbills are making a few appearances on Isle of May and Craigleith respectively along with plenty of fulmars on Fidra. Kittiwakes are yet to arrive at Dunbar harbour but we believe the ‘Beast from the East’ has had a bit of an impact on some of the returning seabirds. The peregrines continue to appear on the posts on the top of Fidra cliff as well as some of the smaller ledges.

To keep up-to-date with the webcam action, click HERE.

Wildlife sightings 8 March 2018

 

Notes from the Discovery Centre team – Mal

We have gannets! They arrived just before the bad storm last week. We have about 10 now. On Fidra the fulmars are returning, slowly but surely, along with some common gulls.

On Craigleith we have a lot more species present, there are herring gulls, shags, cormorants and guillemots.

Eiders have been seen in the last few days returning to Dunbar harbour, which at times seemed to be taking the brunt of the storm. So, it’s nice to see some activity there along with various gulls.

To keep up-to-date with the webcam action, click HERE.

Wildlife sightings 22 February 2018

Notes from the Discovery Centre team – Mal & Erin

 

Fidra is still the best island for variety of species on camera. We again are at a standoff between a pair of fulmars and a peregrine. There are also a few razorbills being spotted at the other side of the island.

The peregrine has also been spotted on Craigleith, however due to the rapid growth of tree mallow can be difficult to see at times. There are also lots of shags with their tufts up, amongst the growing numbers of cormorants in the area.

The gannets have still not landed, but the camera is primed and so are the telescopes, so hopefully soon.

To keep up-to-date with the webcam action, click HERE.